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All domain names have records or details (owner’s details) that are available to the public called WHOis record. The Whois record contains the name of the registrant, along with the contacts for the domain name. Some of the details found in the WHOis record include your name, phone number, country, state, city, physical address and email address. The Whois record also shows the exact date and year for your domain name registration, its expiry date, the location where your site is hosted, including other technical details. You can access the record of your domain name anytime by heading to domaintools.com and typing your domain name in a box called ‘’WhoIs Lookup’’ and then hitting the search button. This is one of the advantages when you buy a domain name.

The reason why domain WhoIs is available to the public

Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has a set guideline that requires all registrars to make all domain name details public. They do this for verification reasons. For example, verification of ownership of domain name when someone initiates domain name transfer. Also, it allows law enforcement agencies to use it easily when investigating illegal activities on the web. Individuals or companies may also leverage these records to get in touch with domain name holders who are going against copyright, as well as other property rights.

Your domain WhoIs record can also be targeted

Your domain record on the WhoIs database can also be targeted and used to do illegal or illegitimate things. Because just about anyone can access your domain records, hackers, spammers, stalkers and identity thieves might harvest your personal information. When hackers get your email address, they can send spam emails and when you click on them; your device gets infected with virus or malware, which can easily harness your personal information.

Is there a way to protect your information on the domain WhoIs

These days, most registrars provide privacy protection. But it’s an option that you have to choose. Most registrars charge for it. When you opt for privacy protection, your domain name record will not be publicly available on the WhoIs database. The registrar’s privacy service information will appear instead. However, you’ll still be totally in charge of your domain name.

The good thing about domain WhoIs privacy protection

When you choose domain name WhoIs privacy protection, your domain name record will be automatically switched to private. That means spammers can’t get access to your email address and send you spam emails or send you fake domain renewal notices from other registrars.

Does domain WhoIs have any disadvantages?

One of the biggest disadvantages to domain privacy protection is that it becomes a daunting task to transfer your domain name. For you to transfer your domain name, you’ll have first to deactivate domain privacy protection. You will also go through a long process to get your domain name transferred. Also, in this day and age where cases of online scams are abundant, traditional and digital media are continually teaching customers how to look up the authenticity of websites through the WhoIs database. That means if you have activated the domain privacy protection, customers will not be able to access your details, and they will think it’s a red flag. However, you can always take steps to ensure that customers don’t get to the stage of checking your WhoIs record by providing comprehensive contact details on your site. Make sure to include numerous ways for the customers to get in touch with you, such as phone number, postal email, fax, and email. It’s also a good idea to have social media pages like Facebook and Twitter to ensure that customers can easily contact you.

Conclusion

Adding domain WhoIs protection is not hard. You only need to contact your registrar and ask about domain WhoIs privacy protection. Some registrars offer this service for free, while others include it in the monthly, quarterly or yearly subscription.

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